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TMJ Disorder: Symptoms and Treatment Options

TMJ disorder stands for temporomandibular joint disorder. This joint is the jaw joint located on either side of the face. The term is actually an umbrella term that can be used to describe disorders of the joint as well as issues with the surrounding muscles or connective tissues.

When there are problems with the jaw joint or the surrounding tissues, the patient can have pain when they speak, chew, or move the jaw from side to side. Along with pain, patients can experience ear pain, severe migraine headaches, difficulty opening the mouth, facial pain, muscle spasms, ringing in the ear, and popping or clicking when they move the jaw joint.


The causes of TMJ disorder can vary from person to person, and your dentist will help you try to get to the root cause in order to treat the symptoms and prevent them from returning.


The causes of TMJ disorder can vary from person to person, and your dentist will help you try to get to the root cause in order to treat the symptoms and prevent them from returning. Causes can include stress, which leads to jaw clenching, grinding of the teeth, problems with the disc in the joint, arthritis in the joint, and more.

The causes of TMJ disorder can vary from person to person, and your dentist will help you try to get to the root cause in order to treat the symptoms and prevent them from returning.

If you are suffering with TMJ issues, your dentist will examine your jaw and teeth and begin with more conservative treatment options. These may include altering how you chew your food, over-the-counter painkillers, and the use of ice or heat packs. Many cases of TMJ can be relieved with these simple steps.

For patients whose TMJ is caused or aggravated by a jaw clenching, grinding of the teeth, or a bad bite, a customized night guard or splint may be recommended. These are appliances placed between the top and bottom teeth to relieve pressure from grinding and clenching, which in turn will relieve tension in the jaw and face.

Some patients might also benefit from an adjustment of the height of some of their teeth, which allows the teeth to come together better when the jaw is closed. This can also correct the bite and relieve tension in the jaw.

Only in extreme cases where other methods are ineffective is surgery considered. Surgery is generally reserved for when the cause of the TMJ is acute, like a slipped disc in the jaw joint.

If you suffer from the symptoms associated with TMJ disorder, contact My Dentist In Plano to learn more about your treatment options.

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